Time 25 Most Influential Business Management Books: 17-25

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Books 1-8 | Books 9-16 | Books 17-25

BookCover_OnBecomingaLeader17. On Becoming a Leader (1989), by Warren Bennis

Leadership guru Warren Bennis's guide to honing your inner leader tends to read more like a self-help book than a business tutorial. Bennis's now classic take on the leadership conundrum calls the dearth of effective leaders a "societal disease" characterized by shortsighted thinking and a lack of self-awareness. The proposed solution? Pointers include honing your "inner voice," cultivating a passion for what you do, and building trust among followers.(By Roya Wolverson, August 9, 2011)

 

 

BookCover_OutoftheCrisis18. Out of the Crisis (1982), by W. Edwards Deming

This is the book that first articulated (without using the term) Total Quality Management, the now-ubiquitous idea that the quality of products and services, and their continuous improvement, is the responsibility of a broad range of corporate stakeholders, from managers and workers to suppliers and even customers. Deming is widely credited (along with Taiichi Ohno) with introducing systematic quality measurement and improvement techniques to Japanese manufacturing in the 1960s, and Out of the Crisis brought his revolutionary ideas to U.S. businesses. The 14 key management principles enumerated in the book directly contradicted many standard practices of the era — including production quotas, "zero defect" slogans, and management by inspection — and became a template for modern management techniques.(By Scott Medintz, Tuesday, August 9, 2011)

BookCover_MyYearswithGeneralMotors19. My Years with General Motors (1964), by Alfred P. Sloan Jr.

The author, the CEO of GM from 1923-1946, was an industry titan who led the Detroit carmaker to become the largest corporation in the world. Publication of this forthright book was blocked for years by GM's lawyers, who feared its revelations about the inside-workings of the company would be used against it in litigation. Sloan's shrewd lessons about managing the automotive behemoth, from corporate structure to product development to finance, are still considered a business-school must-read. "A car for every purse and purpose,"indeed. (By Andrea Sachs, August 9, 2011)

 

BookCover_TheOneMinuteManager20. The One Minute Manager (1982), by Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson

This slim volume, with its simple (critics argued, simple-minded) business homilies, immediately became a worldwide publishing phenomenon, and spent more than two years on the New York Times bestsellers list. In it, would-be effective managers are advised to "catch an employee doing something right," and to reinforce that good behavior with a One Minute Praising. Bad deeds are similarly to be pointed out and punished with a One Minute Reprimand. The authors themselves were accused of a bad deed by the Wall Street Journal — plagiarism, to be exact — which they denied. But by that time, the tiny tome was ubiquitous, having been distributed by FORTUNE 500 companies everywhere. (By Andrea Sachs, August 9, 2011)

 

BookCover_ReengineeringtheCorporation21. Reengineering the Corporation: A Manifesto for Business Revolution (1993), by James Champy and Michael Hammer

Adam Smith's business dictums from the 1800s no longer apply. That's the thinking behind management consultants James Champy and Michael Hammer's 1994 bestseller. Rigid divisions of labor — which once sped up productivity in fledgling corporate America — was now driving the sluggishness and lack of creativity holding firms back, the authors contend. They advocate for a radical redesign of the way companies process and organize their business, including regrouping multiple jobs into one. No wonder the book is credited with inspiring corporate downsizing in the 1990s. In the digital age, its insights still ring true. (By Roya Wolverson, August 9, 2011)

 

BookCover_The7HabitsOfHighlyEffectivePeople22. The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People (1989), by Stephen R. Covey

Stephen Covey's leadership training book is widely recognized as one of the best-selling business books of all time. That's funny, because there is very little in it about business or management. Instead, the book is a tour de force on confidence building packaged into seven easily digestible maxims. There is good advice throughout that could help you in your professional life, but that wasn't among Covey's obvious intentions. The fact that the seven "habits" overlap and aren't all that revelatory — No. 2 boils down to focusing on your goals — hasn't seemed to blunt the book's continuing popularity. (By Stephen Gandel, August 9, 2011) 

 

 

BookCover_TheSixSigmaWay23. The Six Sigma Way: How GE, Motorola and other Top Companies are Honing Their Performance (2000), by Peter S. Pande, Robert P. Neuman and Roland R. Cavanagh

Before Six Sigma became a cultural punch line — 30 Rock's Jack Donaghy is a green belt master — it was the gold standard in management philosophy. Developed in the 1970s and 1980s at Motorola and GE, Six Sigma-ites believe that the path to success is paved by near constant measurement of the performance of your company and workers. Instant feedback is the key. The Six Sigma Way, published in 2000 and co-written by Six Sigma guru Peter Pande, brought the management technique to the masses. The book draws heavily on the experiences of GE and other companies that successfully implemented the technique. (By Stephen Gandel, August 9, 2011)

BookCover_ToyotaProductionSystem24. Toyota Production System (1988), by Taiichi Ohno

After World War II, Taiichi Ohno, an engineer at Toyota, began experimenting with the assembly lines at the Japanese firm's automobile factories. His goal was to improve efficiency and catch up with America's Big Three. The result of Ohno's tinkering changed the manufacturing industry forever. Ohno and his managers devised the Toyota Production System, more broadly known as "lean manufacturing," which gave Toyota a huge edge in productivity and quality control. The new system ensured Toyota's position as an industry leader, and its principles were adopted within factories across sectors and countries. This little gem of a book outlines Ohno's quest and provides insights into the crucial process of innovation that are valuable for managers of all types. (By Michael Schuman, August 9, 2011)

BookCover_WhoMovedMyCheese25. Who Moved My Cheese? (1998), by Spencer Johnson

This slender work, a parable of mice and (little) men in a maze, can be read in 30 minutes, max. Its message is simple: Embrace change because it is inevitable. Nonetheless, there is a cult of Cheese, composed of readers (some of them CEOs) who extol the virtues of this book and say that it has changed their lives and workplaces. Truckloads of books have been handed out by top executives who hope to make their employees more flexible than Hem, the intransigent character who bellows the title line when faced with changed circumstances. The book also has its share of detractors, in the form of parodies with names like "Who Cut the Cheese?" But Johnson, also the co-author of The One Minute Manager, is undoubtedly laughing all the way to the bank; Cheese is the bestselling business book of all time, with more than 20 million copies sold. (By Andrea Sachs, August 9, 2011) 

Books 1-8 | Books 9-16 | Books 17-25

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Read 1260 times Last modified on Sunday, 20 April 2014 23:07

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